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Club news: Brownsdale Study Club Meets in May

Fern Paschke hosted the Brownsdale Study Club on Wednesday, May 19.  Vice President Shelley Vogel presided in the absence of Rena Perrigo.  As roll call was announced, those present were asked to name their favorite form of music.  Choices included easy listening, classic country and hymns.  Five members were in attendance and, while masks were brought, no one felt compelled to wear one.

Shelley got the meeting underway with the reading of the Collect, followed by Old Business.  The only correction from the April meeting was that Fern would be hosting in May and Mary Kidwiler Moritz would host in June.  The treasurer’s report showed no money going out from the previous month.

Moving on to New Business, discussion came up about, possibly, reviewing the By-Laws of the organization and making changes to the protocol of the Study Club.  This could include replacing an outside reading with an historical look-back at minutes from meetings of long ago.  In addition, it was suggested that the office of Vice President could include the role of Historian and Treasurer, relieving the Secretary/Treasurer of so much work.  The issue was tabled for now.  Election of new officers occurs in August, and these additional issues can be brought up then.  No other New Business was brought before the group and the meeting was adjourned with a motion by Therese Manggaard and seconded by Fern.

The Outside Reading was provided by Shelley entitled, Oakley Kansas:  Birthplace of the Legend of Buffalo Bill Cody.  It appears that in 1868, William F. Cody was employed by the Kansas Pacific Railroad to hunt buffalo for supplying the railroad crew with meat.  He soon earned the title of Buffalo Bill Cody.

At the same time, Bill Comstock, a scout for nearby Fort Wallace also came to be known as Buffalo Bill, as his job was to hunt buffalo to feed soldiers at the Camp.  It appeared as though both men could not hold the title of Buffalo Bill.  Therefore, a contest was proposed and organized, a contest that would be advertised as far away as St. Louis.  The contest would offer a prize of $500.00 to the contestant that could kill the most buffalo in an 8-hr. time frame.  William F. Cody was determined to be the winner when he bagged 69 buffalo to Comstock’s 46.  Cody won the cash prize and was, forever, given the title of Buffalo Bill Cody.

Main Topic was assigned to Fern, and she selected National Poppy Day:  The Day that Honors Veterans.   It was the American Legion who petitioned Congress to declare the Friday before Memorial Day (this year May 25) as National Poppy Day.  This tradition began in 1918 by Morina Michael who began wearing a poppy flower to pay tribute to lives lost in World War I.

It occurred after the battles of World War I; poppies graced the burial grounds in France and Belgium because the seeds of the flowers can lay dormant for years, yet bloom abundantly when the soil is disturbed or freshly dug.  The American Legion Auxiliary raises money, through the sale of paper or fabric poppies, to support veterans, their families and active duty military.

Before enjoying Fern’s delicious rhubarb cake, announcements included LaVonne Skov has become a great-grandmother for the first time.  In addition, Shelley Vogel announced that her son, Carter, currently completing his sophomore year at South Dakota State University in Brookings, is a member of the SDSU Marching Ban which has been invited to perform at the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in November, 2022.  Carter plays the saxophone and will be in his senior year when the band travels to New York City.  Submitted by Mary Kidwiler Moritz, Secretary