The Conservation Corps of Minnesota and Iowa recently pulled about 220 tires from a stretch along the Cedar River south of Austin. Since 2011, volunteers and workers have pulled nearly 700 tires from the river in the area. Photo provided by Nate Howard
The Conservation Corps of Minnesota and Iowa recently pulled about 220 tires from a stretch along the Cedar River south of Austin. Since 2011, volunteers and workers have pulled nearly 700 tires from the river in the area. Photo provided by Nate Howard

Archived Story

Recent effort ups tire removal from Cedar to 700

Published 10:24am Thursday, November 14, 2013

A recent effort by the Conservation Corps of Minnesota and Iowa resulted in about 220 tires removed from the Cedar River, and since 2011, people have now removed nearly 700 tires from the local waterway.

The Cedar River Watershed District has covered the cost of the tires’ proper disposal. Prior to the Conservation Corps project, almost all of the tires were removed by volunteers enrolled in the CRWD’s “Adopt-A-River” program.

“The Cedar River is a beautiful waterway in our area, and the hard work recently made by the Conservation Corps members to remove such a large number of tires will help increase the enjoyment of the river for everyone who uses it,” said Justin Hanson, CRWD resource specialist.

Austin resident Mike Hull’s group of volunteers adopted a stretch of the Cedar River from the Solafide Observatory south of Austin to the County Road 4 bridge and had identified at least 100 tires along their section of the river during two cleanups. At the advice of the CRWD, the group focused its cleanups on removing trash and debris — which filled their canoes — and leaving the tires for a larger CRWD project.

CRWD then brought the Conservation Corps for a large tire-removal project this fall south of Austin for the Hull group’s adopted stretch of the Cedar River and continuing downstream to the County Road 6 bridge, Hanson said. Fifteen Conservation Corps members worked on the project, totaling about 400 individual hours of work on behalf of the CRWD, he said.

Additionally through its work for the CRWD, Conservation Corps members removed about 14,000 pounds of trash from a dump site north of the village of Lansing along the Cedar River. A four-person crew also worked to open a stretch of the Cedar River between the Ramsey Dam and Wildwood Park for canoeists and kayakers. Some areas had been blocked by fallen trees and debris.

“That stretch of the Cedar River is now fully floatable without any areas requiring you to portage your canoe or kayak,” Hanson said. “That was always an issue before this project.”

Within Mower County, the Cedar River is designated as a State Water Trail under a Minnesota Department of Natural Resources’ program. In 2011, the CRWD successfully proposed and secured the legislative approval needed for designating the Cedar River as an official State Water Trail.


By using this website’s user-contribution features, including comments, photo galleries, or any other feature, you agree to abide by the terms of use. Please read this agreement in its entirety because it contains useful information that will help you better understand the rules and general "good manners" that are expected when contributing content to this website.

Sign in to Comment | Need help commenting? Click here

Editor's Picks