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After thaw, wintry weather returns to Midwest, Northeast

Published 10:10am Wednesday, March 12, 2014

CHICAGO — A wet snow forced residents of Chicago and the Midwest to once again break out shovels and slog to work along slippery roads and slow transit lines, a reality check for winter-weary residents who had just reveled in a day or so of spring-like temperatures. Along the storm’s eastward track, upstate New York was gearing up for a blizzard.

Tens of thousands of homes and businesses in northern Illinois lost power and a few hundred flights were canceled at Chicago’s airports, including Midway International, where 6 inches of snow fell. The storm was moving east into northern Indiana, and it was forecast to hit the Great Lakes in Ohio, Pennsylvania and upstate New York before dissipating over Canada.

“The roads were just horrible, it was pretty hazardous conditions out there,” said Stephen Rodriguez, National Weather Service meteorologist in Romeoville, Ill. He said an initial forecast for 8 inches of snow in the city was overblown, but that the impact on the morning commute was significant.

Forecasters warned that as much as 9 inches of snow could fall in parts of southeastern Michigan, with 4 to 8 inches in Detroit. Before the sun rose Wednesday, snow and sleet were making roads slippery across a large southern swath of the state. Hundreds of schools closed their doors for the day.

The picture was similar in upstate New York, where hundreds of schools called off classes after the weather service warned that a blizzard with winds of up to 50 mph could paralyze the area from western New York to the Adirondacks.

Chicago had already been buried by 75.5 inches of snow this winter — the fourth most on record dating back to 1884-1885, according to the weather service. The snowfall on Wednesday pushed the seasonal total into third place, ahead of the 77.0 inch total from 1969-1970, though with some snow still falling Wednesday morning a final tally was not complete.

 


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